one day in boston (4)

One Day in Boston

Profile Spotlight: Jesse Ciulla

Art in the Streets from Jesse Ciulla on Vimeo.

1. Who are you and what is your profession?
My name is Jesse Ciulla and I am a Boston based cinematographer and editor.

2. Can you tell us a little about your background and upbringing?
Well, I've lived in the Boston area my entire life: Revere Massachusetts for 22 years and Allston Massachusetts for 2 years. I've had a pretty average upbringing and an above average mother who has supported me in whatever decisions I've made in my 24 years.

3. What inspired you to become a filmmaker?
Skateboarding. Skateboarding is the only reason why I ever decided to pick up a camera. It started with just going around filming my friends skating and eventually that drew my attention to other aspects of filmmaking which interested me. I eventually pursued that interest in college and, now, here I am.

4. Who or what do you most admire?
I admire anybody who does something that they enjoy for a living ESPECIALLY in the creative world. If you can make a living doing something that you like and it's creative, then I am most likely going to admire you.

5. What do you love about Boston?
The fact that you can get from one end of the city to the other within probably an hour on public transportation is pretty great. That and Boston in the fall is pretty hard to beat weather-wise. Downtown Boston on a 50 degree day in October is ideal.

6. What do you fear most for Boston?
That's a tough one. I don't have many concerns for Boston, it's adapted to the times pretty well thus far. I guess if anything, the size of the city could be a concern. The fact that Boston is a lot smaller than many other major cities could contribute to the city being overlooked.

7. What do you hope for Boston in the next 20 years?
Hopefully in the next 20 years Boston can continue to support and grow all of the small communities and cultures that make Boston the great little city that it is.
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One Day in Boston

Profile Spotlight: Beth Balaban

Son of Saichi (1-minute trailer) from Beth Balaban on Vimeo.

1. Who are you and what is your profession?
My name means Beth, "To Serve Bread with Honey" in Turkish. I'm a non-fiction filmmaker.

2. Can you tell us a little about your background and upbringing?
My academic background is in psychology, philosophy and creative writing. My cultural background is Midwestern. 

3. What inspired you to become a filmmaker?
I can't say I have any sort of miracle narrative for how I arrived at being a filmmaker. At my own peril, I wandered toward it - like walking into the light even though the voices are screaming "Don't do it!" It's just the thing I love doing the very most, and I can't imagine doing anything else.

4. Who or what do you most admire?
I admire intellectual rigor and ferocity and I admire people who have arrived at their own Truth.

5. What do you love about Boston?
I know it's dorky, but Boston to me feels like the home of documentary and that's why I'm here. Some of the greats started here and really pioneered the art form...and the lingering effect is an ongoing conversation about craft and storytelling on a large scale. That's hard to find everywhere else.

6. What do you fear most for Boston?
My biggest fear for my city is gentrification. Admittedly, I might be part of the "problem" - but there's a great depth of beautiful cultural heritage in the Boston area and if housing/development keeps going in the direction it is now, we're going to wash it all out of our diverse city.

7. What do you hope for Boston in the next 20 years?
As Boston continues to grow over the next 20 years, I hope that city planners take human interests into account and design a future city where quality of life trumps commerce and cars.

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One Day in Boston

NewEnglandFilm.com Interview

Full Article

From NewEnglandFilm.com...

One Day on Earth, the organization behind the effort to amass footage from around the world, will host an online event One Day in Boston on April 26th. As part of this city-wide, crowdsourcing event, filmmakers (and non-filmmakers) shoot video on April 26th that addresses 10 questions about the future of Boston posed by One Day on Earth. The uploaded videos will be available to the public and part of One Day on Earth's social outreach platform.

NewEnglandFilm.com’s Ted Ryan interviews Cecily Tyler, co-founder and producer of One Day in Boston, about the virtual event. Tyler is an award-winning producer from Boston and New York City. She has worked the Discovery networks; NBC News Learn, New York Times Television, BBC NYC, Brown Alpert Medical School, and YouthBuild USA.

Ted Ryan: First of all, could you give us a brief synopsis of the event?

Cecily Tyler: One Day on Earth is a 24-hour filming campaign that invites you to document what’s happening in your city and to capture authentic, compelling narratives. So you would shoot all your footage on April 26th. Then, you have a month to post and upload to our website.

TR: How did One Day on Earth start?

Tyler: One Day On Earth was a worldwide media event, bringing together thousands of participants and simultaneously filming over a 24-hour period, the first being on Oct. 10, 2010. Participants in every country of the world contributed on this same day. The United Nations and over 60 non-profit organizations participated, and we collectively created over 3,000 hours of video, including a groundbreaking feature film.

Right now, we want to create the same type of event but focus on cities here in the United States. We call this program "Your Day. Your City. Your Future." Boston is on the list. We invite filmmakers, organizations, or anyone that is feeling inspired with a camera to shoot for this One Day In Boston event.

TR: There are 10 questions you pose to each participant when creating their video for One Day in Boston. They include what we love about our city, the solutions to its problems, and its future. What is the genesis of these questions?

Tyler: We traveled to all 11 participating cities before the launch. We saw similar issues and themes resonating in each city, an we devised questions that will serve as a springboard for the discussion.

TR: How do you hope to see these questions explored in the videos that participants upload?

Tyler: I hope people share from their hearts what is meaningful to them, what drives them, and what is creating fear for them. I want people to seek and discover what they love and what they want to change. Most importantly, I want to hear their solutions.

TR: So, you don't need to be a professional to participate?

Tyler: Not at all. We all have it in us to tell a story!

TR: For a first-timer making a video, do you have a list of recommended steps to follow?

Tyler: We have free educational toolkits on OneDayInBoston.org. I recommend considering how you are telling the story visually: how do you show the answers to these 10 questions? Think about your shot list. Show the subject, but also set the scene. Show the details. Show the visual representation of the topic.

TR: What is the importance of having all these videos shot on the one day, April 26th?

Tyler: It makes us realize that this is all happening now and makes you reflect on the shared connection between us all. The day is an event – it is a way for us all to come together and make something.

TR: Eleven other cities across the country are holding this same event. As producer for the Boston-based event, what do you find unique about this city?

Tyler: There are so many compelling, unique stories I’ve come across in Boston. From issues like housing and labor, to innovation and life transitions. What I’ve come away with so far is that we are an incredibly engaged and united city, made up of a diverse mosaic of neighborhoods, backgrounds and experiences and there are so many great stories to tell.

Everything from the work being done at Haley House, Madison Park Development Corporation, the Handel and Haydn Society, New England Region Council of Carpenters, the Wyss Institute, to The Mayor’s Youth Council - I’m just really impressed by our town.

TR: After participants upload their videos to the site, what happens?

Tyler: Each of the completed videos will be put into a public shared archive website. Which means anyone on the web will have the opportunity to see your work. We also anticipate that numerous non-profit partners in Boston and throughout the country will be posting and promoting videos that resonate with their organizations. Last but not least - we will be holding community screenings, which showcase videos from that particular area.

TR:As producer, educator, and citizen, what do you hope to accomplish with One Day in Boston?

Tyler:We hope to provide Bostonians with a platform to show the world their Boston, through their lens: what we love about our city, what are our challenges, the solutions we need, the people and places that make it so unique, and to envision how the city will evolve in the next 20 years. It’s a pivotal opportunity to capture a moment in time for our city. We have changes going in many areas of our city right now — this chance to share our voice is so timely.

One Day in Boston is also working with local broadcasters to create a TV series that will include the stories and opinions shared, diving deeper into questions investigating the future of American cities.

To sign up and learn more, go to http://onedayinboston.org/ or see more about One Day on Earth at http://www.onedayonearth.org

A preview of the event can be viewed online at: http://vimeo.com/90278094

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One Day in Boston

Profile Spotlight: Stebs Schinnerer

MIT Architecture from Paper Fortress on Vimeo.

1. Who are you and what is your profession?
My name is Steven Joseph Schinnerer, but most people call me Stebs. I am lucky enough to make a profession out of being a filmmaker, and more often than not just telling stories.

2. Can you tell us a little about your background and upbringing?
I was born in a nice little town on the coast of Massachusetts and lived with my mom, my dad, my sister and my pets. I played with my friends, ate a lot of cereal, rode my bicycle and got a lot of stitches - really, I had a very stress-free childhood. My parents worked their butts off to give my sister and I a good life - but living in that small town made me itch to see what else was out there. Not just that, but to understand the world around me in a deeper way by meeting people and getting to know their world and their struggles. I hadn't had too difficult a life growing up and it's definitely something that drew me to understand a world outside of my own.

3. What inspired you to become a filmmaker? 
I grew up watching my father paint - creating something from scratch - and definitely caught the creative bit that way. My parents always had the home video VHS camera out during family events and I decided to use it to make silly videos. Eventually, I went to school for film, all while making my own dumb videos and realized I could use this as a platform to tell interesting and sometimes personal stories. I loved edgy and interesting films, and after working in a video store for five years in middle school and high school, I fell in love with the idea of becoming a filmmaker.

4. Who or what do you most admire?
This is a really hard question to answer. I admire many things about many people...but I suppose I can boil it down to that I simply admire the human spirit. I admire perseverance and dedication. Confident people with a willingness to stand up for what they believe in. From Mandela and Ghandi, to my best friend and my mom, there are deep qualities in many people that I find admiration in.

5. What do you love about Boston?
Boston is a little-big city with a HUGE heart. The communities are incredibly diverse, the culture is rampant and you can't beat its history. We have some of the most die-hard sports fans in the nation, and some of the most intelligent people in the world walking the streets. We have people pushing the limits of technology, healthcare, business, food, sport, philanthropy and pretty much everything else you can think of. It inspires me to walk through the MIT and Harvard campuses, through communities having block parties and fund raisers, or through bustling farmers markets multiple times a week. All in all, this city and the people in it just never cease to impress and inspire me.

6. What do you fear most for Boston?
I fear that in the name of progress, too many of the quiet and simple communities will be torn apart by major developers to make way for big apartment buildings and chain restaurants and cafés. One thing I love about this city is how many small businesses there are, and I fear that our city could become stale if broken apart for big business.

7. What do you hope for Boston in the next 20 years?
During the next 20 years, I hope to see our tech industry grow and for us to continue to be on the forefront of science, education and technology. I also hope that more of the privileged communities will help to lift up, inspire, and care for the under-resourced. This city will best be served when everyone has equal opportunity, and when the haves can care more frequently for the have-nots.

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